Digital smile makeovers

- Examples of how crowns can be used to rebuild front teeth that have worn excessively.

The digital smile makeovers on this page illustrate how dental crowns can be used to rebuild and restore the appearance of worn front teeth.

(We've stipulated the placement of crowns with these cases because they seem to be instances where the strength and durability that they offer is required.)

Case #1: Repairing excessive wear.

The front teeth of this smile are extensively worn.

A) Before - View makeover's full-sized animation.

Dental history and concerns:

In this "before" picture, you can see how this person's front teeth, especially their center two, show substantial wear.

We'd suspect that this is an indication that they have a deep overbite (meaning that their teeth overlap quite a bit when closed). This situation, when combined with a tooth-grinding habit, could easily result in the appearance seen in this picture.

Other issues.

Besides just wear, the upper front teeth have white fillings that have deteriorated and stained. In back on the upper right, there appears to be some missing teeth.

Treatment solutions:

After dental crown placement.

B) After crown placement - View makeover's full-sized animation.

Rebuilding the teeth using crowns.

Our "after" picture shows how dental crowns could be used to restore the upper front teeth. The placement of each one would both provide a repair for that tooth's chipped biting edge and worn out filling.

With this case, crowns would seem to make a better choice than dental veneers due to the superior strength characteristics they offer. (For more information: Crowns vs. veneers.)

Repairs for other teeth.

A dental bridge or tooth implants might be used to replace the missing teeth on the upper right. Doing so would allow more chewing function to be shifted to the back of the mouth where it belongs.

For the lower teeth, the treating dentist could even out their irregular biting edges (as shown in our "after" picture) by buffing them down with a dental drill. This should be a quick and painless procedure.


Case #2: Repairing, and realigning, worn teeth by placing dental crowns.

Dental history and concerns:

The biting edges of these teeth are very worn.

A) Before - View makeover's full-sized animation.

This person's front teeth show a fair amount of wear on their biting edges.

Similar to the case above, it's cause is likely related to the way this person's teeth come together. They have a deep overbite, meaning their teeth overlap significantly when closed together.

Poor tooth alignment.

What's different with this case is that the alignment of the upper front teeth isn't as perfect. The center two teeth (the central incisors) are crooked. The two teeth that lie to each side (the lateral incisors) seem set back just slightly.

This makeover illustrates how both of these issues can be resolved by placing crowns.

Treatment solutions:

Teeth repaired using dental crowns.

B) After crown placement - View makeover's full-sized animation.

a) Rebuilding the front teeth with crowns.

Our "after" picture illustrates how dental crowns might be used to repair the worn edges of the upper central incisors as well as improve their apparent alignment and overall shape.

Why crowns make the best choice.

One treatment alternative for this case might be to place porcelain veneers. Doing so, however, probably wouldn't provide as lasting a repair.

Veneers can give an excellent cosmetic end result but when they are exposed to excessive forces (like those that have worn down these teeth) they can chip or break. (Use the above links for information about applications for veneers.)

b) Improving the apparent alignment of the upper teeth.

The dental crowns fabricated for the lateral incisors could be made in a fashion where their front surface is slightly over contoured. By doing so, they would create the illusion of more perfect tooth alignment.


Case #3: Repairing worn biting edges of teeth.

Dental history and concerns:

The biting edges of these teeth are very worn.

A) Before - View makeover's full-sized animation.

With this last case, several of this person's upper front teeth show signs of chipping and wear. (It's likely that a tooth-grinding habit has played a role in creating this type of damage.)

The overall alignment of this person's teeth is fairly reasonable, although not perfect. The general shape of some of the teeth could use some improvement too.

Treatment solutions:

Teeth repaired using dental crowns.

B) After crown placement - View makeover's full-sized animation.

Placing dental crowns would address all of the issues outlined above.

1) The strength characteristics of the crowns (as opposed to those of veneers) should make a strong, lasting repair for the worn edges of the teeth.

2) The shape and alignment corrections needed for this smile are relatively minor and easily lie within that level of changes that crowns are routinely used to make.


Smile makeover cases that illustrate rebuilding worn teeth with dental crowns.


Fixing a small cavity, rebuilding worn teeth.

The most detracting aspect of this person's smile is the dark spot on their upper right tooth. And while that, no...

Worn teeth / Bruxism - This smile has the characteristic wear pattern of a person who grinds their teeth. You can literally visualize how the smooth surfaces and notches of the biting edges of the upper and lower teeth fit together. Dental crowns - As this case outlines, unless this grinding habit can be controlled, dental crowns offer the only hope for a lasting outcome.


Rebuilding front teeth that have worn excessively.

This digital smile makeover gives an example of how dental crowns might be used to rebuild and restore the...

a) Worn teeth - The upper teeth of this smile show wear, likely due to a habit of tooth grinding. b) Crowns - As this makeover explains, the extensive nature of this wear and resulting fragile status of the teeth means that dental crowns (and the strength characteristics they offer) would make the best choice.

 

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