An Oral-B powered toothbrush.

Oral-B Pro 3000

Which are the best Oral-B electric toothbrush models? (Updated April 2016) -

a) Which Oral-B rechargeable brushes make the best choice (function and value).   b) Which features are the most important ones to have.   c) A comparison of models based on features.

Since our Best Sonicares page has been so well received, we've decided to make the same type of features-based comparison for the current line up of Braun Oral-B powered toothbrushes too.

And while we do feel that we've come up with a single model that really does make a best choice (the PRO 3000), what this page does is take you through all of the options and features that Oral-B brushes have to offer. And then explains why (or why not) each of them is important to have, or offers good value, and then which brushes have them.

Who will benefit from our evaluation?

This page is primarily geared toward what we consider the "average" user (which in our mind makes up the vast majority of people who purchase a powered brush). And especially those for whom price and value are important factors.

But even those who have special needs can benefit from reading our review too. By doing so they should be able to pick up enough information to get an understanding about which model makes the best choice for their particular situation.


Which models do we compare?

Here's a list of all of the Oral-B toothbrushes we've included in our evaluation:

  • Oral-B Black 7000 with Bluetooth Connectivity - ($220)
  • Oral-B White 7000 with Bluetooth Connectivity - ($220)
  • Oral-B Pro 5000 with Bluetooth Connectivity - ($160)
  • Oral-B Pro 3000 - ($100)
  • Oral-B Pro 1000 - ($65)
  • Oral-B Vitality Floss Action - ($30)
  • Oral-B Vitality Dual Clean - ($30)

Why did we choose these models?

The brushes above make up the entire list of models found on the Oral-B (USA) website on April 4, 2016 on their "Electric Toothbrushes >> View all products" page. (The grid that displayed these names did not include any model numbers, nor did the Oral-B website in general.)

Changes from previous updates.

If you've used this page previously you may have noticed that the above list is much shorter than it has been in the past. In reality, in some ways it is but in others it really isn't.

That's because in previous years many of the available Oral-B "models," having totally unrelated names, were simply the same motorized handle (either precisely so, or at least for all practical purposes) with just a different brush head stuck on it. That may be great for marketing but that's not the way we think customers trying to make a decision should be treated.

With this year's list, some of this same type of foolishness still seems to be going on but to a much lesser extent. (If you find yourself in the situation where you run across an Oral-B product but don't find it listed here, this information may help you to decipher its name and features so you can make accurate comparisons.)

About the prices we show.

As you can see, these models encompass a wide range of prices ($220 down to just $30). These numbers reflect the MSRP prices shown on the Oral-B website.

We couldn't help but to notice that all MSRP's were shown as a range. We assumed that that meant that different (additional) options were available for each model. But when viewing each toothbrush's individual page we could find no evidence of this. (The price we show is the higher end of the range given.)

While checking online for availability, we noticed that many retailers sold each of the models at discounted prices (sometimes significantly so), so be sure to shop around.


Setting the criteria for our Best Oral-B evaluation.

We've set up this comparison essentially the same way we did for Sonicares. In our opinion, the best Braun Oral-B toothbrush models are those that:

  • Are the least expensive ...
  • feature a "non-contact" brushing capability (we explain below) ...
  • can be used with a wide range of brush head styles ...
  • and otherwise only have those additional features that the person using the brush feels are especially important to them.

Using these criteria, it may seem that our review is just about which Oral-B rechargeable makes the "best buy," and in some ways it possibly is. But make no mistake about it, the model we've selected brushes just as effectively as any other Oral-B and really is our preferred choice.


Features that Oral-B electrics tend to share.

Before discussing differences, there are some features that Oral-B powered toothbrushes tend to share. It's important for you to know about them both so you'll know what you're getting, and can make comparisons with other brands.

a) Brushing and Quadrant timers.

All of the models we mention on this page feature a 2-minute brushing timer. (The most advanced Oral-B's allow you to customize their timer's duration, see below.)

And all except the Vitality models also feature a Quadrant timer that signals as each 1/4th of the brushing timer's duration lapses (which is typically every 30 seconds).

What's the purpose?

The idea of using a Quadrant timer is that it helps to guide you in brushing all areas of your mouth equally. So every time it signals, you advance to cleaning the next 1/4th of your mouth.

[More details about Oral-B brushing/quadrant timers.]

b) Brushing-pressure indicator.

This feature signals the user when they are applying too much pressure as they brush. [Vitality models do not have a pressure indicator. More details about this feature.]

c) Rechargeable battery.

All of the toothbrushes we compare on this page are rechargeable. According to Oral-B literature, some models run longer between charges than others. (See this page for model comparisons.) The Oral-B Genius models feature a lithium-ion battery. All of the others have a NiMH one.

A criticism of Oral-B brushes in general is that their charging units only operate on 110V (US/Canada models) and not 220V systems. (Depending on the voltage standards in your country, the reverse may be true.)

World travelers may find this incompatibility to be an inconvenience and necessitate purchasing a voltage converter. [More details about recharging Oral-B electrics.]

d) Brush heads.

All of the toothbrushes discussed on this page have handles (the part with a motor) that can be used with any style of Oral-B brush head.

For this reason, in our model comparison we assign zero importance to which type originally comes packaged with a brush. The head is a disposable item and one that you'll be replacing in just 3 months or so anyway. At that time you can select a different style if you want.

We discuss replacement options below, and the topic of brush heads in general here.


Oral-B Deep Sweep and Floss Action brush heads.

Oral-B Deep Sweep and (rotary-style) Floss Action brush heads.

How you brush with an Oral-B.

It's important for you to realize that the way you brush with most Oral-B brush heads is different than you might expect. And this difference may be a determining factor in deciding if this brand is right for you or not.

Rotary brush heads.

With most Oral-B brush heads (the rotary ones) you brush one tooth at a time. That's different than with a regular manual, or even a sonic, toothbrush.

The Deep Sweep.

Oral-B has designed the Deep Sweep head. It's shaped and used more like a traditional toothbrush. So, you do have both options if you want them.

However you do need to keep in mind that while there are 7 styles of rotary heads, you're limited to just the one choice with the Deep Sweep. There's not even a miniaturized version of this head for those who need a smaller brush.


Oral-B features we don't have a lot of interest in.

One of the criteria for picking out what we think is the Best Oral-B is not considering those models that are loaded up with options that might be considered superfluous. And in that regard there are two features that are found on higher-end models that we'll make mention of.

Note: We discuss the Bluetooth and SmartGuide options separately but nowadays these features only come bundled together.

a) The Bluetooth connectivity / Smartphone app.

This feature puts your toothbrush in communication (via Bluetooth technology) with an Oral-B app that's been installed on your smartphone.

  • It displays entertainment items on your phone (news, weather, calendar) for you to view while you're brushing.
  • It relays the current status of your brush's brushing/quadrant timer, pressure sensor and brushing mode.
  • The app allows you to lengthen the duration of the toothbrush's brushing/quadrant timer.
  • The app allows you to review details about your brushing history.

[This page explains the use of this option in greater detail.]

Is this feature important to have?

  • Some of what this option does is redundant with what your toothbrush signals anyway. And the entertainment aspect of the app (news, weather) can only be considered a novelty feature at best.
  • Being able to customize the duration of the brushing/quadrant timer is nice. But Oral-B electrics don't automatically shut off once their standard 2 minute timer has signaled. So you can keep on (seamlessly) brushing for longer if you want. It's just that there's no timer involved.
  • The idea of being able to see your brushing history is appealing.

    But for the average user, who has a daily habit of brushing their teeth, who brushes until their brush's timer signals them to stop? We could tell you a month in advance what their brushing history will look like.

    For the problem brusher we do get how this feature could be a benefit, if it gets used.

Overall, we can see how some people might really enjoy this option. But in terms of being a "must have" for the average user, we definitely don't feel that it is.

An Oral-B Smartguide unit.

Oral-B Smartguide unit.

b) The wireless SmartGuide.

This unit is a small stand-alone LCD screen that wirelessly communicates with your toothbrush.

It displays information about your brushing session, such as the current status of the brushing/quadrant timer, which brushing mode is being used and the excessive pressure indicator.

[This page outlines and discusses the features of this unit in greater detail.]

Is the Smartguide important to have?

It's pretty easy to dismiss a true "need" for having this feature. That's because the information it displays is already relayed to you (although admittedly more crudely) by your toothbrush via various vibrations, lights and sounds.


It's time to take another look at our Best Oral-B candidates.

Not opting for the Bluetooth/SmartGuide feature cuts many of the more expensive models from our list.

Off our list.

  • Black 7000 with Bluetooth Connectivity
  • White 7000 with Bluetooth Connectivity
  • Pro 5000 with Bluetooth Connectivity
 

Models still in consideration.

  • PRO 3000
  • PRO 1000
  • Vitality (various versions)
 

A '2D' rotary electric toothbrush's motion.

Rotary (2D) brushing motion.

"3D" brushing action - This is why you buy an Oral-B electric.

Each Oral-B powered toothbrush either generates the product line's "2D" or "3D" brushing motion.

  • 2D movement (oscillating-rotating) is the more primitive of the two. The brush head's bristles rotate back and forth as they scrub the user's teeth.
  • 3D movement (oscillating-rotating + pulsating) is a more sophisticated motion and creates an important brushing difference.
An oscillating/rotating/pulsating powered toothbrush.

Oscillate-rotate + pulsate (3D) brushing action.

"Non-contact" brushing.

The pulsing action that Oral-B as incorporated into its 3D movement adds a second type of cleansing action.

It's called "non-contact" brushing and it's an effect where a toothbrush can dislodge dental plaque in locations that lie beyond where its bristles actually touch. (It's due to the way the brush's high-frequency pulsations agitate the fluids that surround teeth.)

[Sonic toothbrushes create this same effect too. We explain how it works here.]

It's important to note that non-contact brushing doesn't remove as much dental plaque as plain old tooth scrubbing does (bristles scouring tooth surfaces). But it is a valuable secondary mechanism. And for that reason, for our Best Oral-B's list, we're only going to consider models that have it.

Which Oral-B models feature 3D brushing?

Actually, this is only part of the right question to ask. The full question should read, which models offer 3D movement at the highest available frequency?

20,000 vs. 40,000 pulses per minute.

When you evaluate Oral-B 3D brushes, you'll find that some of them can generate up to 40,000 pulses per minute, where as others have a top frequency of only 20,000.

You can think of the latter as a lower power setting. And for our Best list, were only going to consider the high-power models because they make the most effective/efficient brushers.

[If you'd like to read more about how Oral-B's work and brushing settings, use this link.]


It's time to trim our Best Oral-B's list again.

Using our high-frequency, 3D brushing mode criteria, we need to remove some more brushes from our list of candidates. You may notice that it's all of the less expensive models.

Brushes we're removing from consideration.

These models only feature 2D brushing.

  • Vitality - All versions
 

This model only features 20,000 pulses-per-minute 3D brushing.

  • PRO 1000
 
Update - Fact checking.

Our claim here that the 1000 models only feature a "20,000 pulses-per-minute 3D brushing action" is a bit controversial.

  • You can find some Oral-B documents and information on retailer websites that agree with this statement.
  • But, as one commenter has pointed out below, you can also find online Oral-B and retailer information that instead states that these brushes create the 40,000 pulses-per-minute 3D action (the better brushing motion).
  • The current version of the Oral-B website seems ambivalent on this point.

We called the Oral-B Help Line a number of times and asked about this but got conflicting answers. Since with any verbal communication there's always a chance that the other party misinterpreted what was said, we decided to use the "email us" form on the Oral-B website.

  • Our written question specifically asked if the Professional Care 1000 and the Deep Sweep 1000 are both 40,000 pulsations per minute brushes.

This is their emailed reply, sent June 25, 2015:

  • That’s a great question. The Professional Care 1000 and the Deep Sweep 1000 are actually the same model, they are just packaged with different brush heads. This model has 20,000 pulsations and 8,800 oscillations per minute.
A more recent check.

Later in the year we decided to call Oral-B to confirm this information yet again. We talked to a representative on 11/5/2015 asking if the Pro 1000 and Deep Sweep 1000 were 20,000 or 40,000 pulsations-per-minute brushes.

Their answer was that both are "20,000" brushes. The representative suggested that the confusion possibly stems from the fact that this statement is true for the USA market but may not be for these products as sold in other countries. We don't know or have further information about that.


An Oral-B PRO 3000 electric toothbrush.

Oral-B PRO 3000

Our Best Oral-B list has narrowed down to just one model.

  • The PRO 3000 - ($100)  (Price this and other Oral-b's at Walmart.com.)

Yes, this is it. The PRO 3000 is the Oral-B rechargeable electric toothbrush that we think is the best one to buy.

  • All of the higher-end models sport features and options that we don't feel we would spend money on.
  • All of the lower-end models feature a subpar brushing action.
  • As a side note, this was one of the two brushes this review selected last year.
  • Use this link for more details about the PRO 3000.

A rundown on what you're getting with the PRO 3000.

Just because we like the 3000 doesn't necessarily mean that you don't need some convincing. You may still anticipate that another model is still the way to go.

We won't encourage you to consider the PRO 1000 or either of the Vitality brushes due to their subpar brushing action. But as a way of helping you to compare the 3000 with the features of other higher-end Oral-B's (which we consider to be good brushes just not exceptional values), or even other electric toothbrush brands, here's a brief overview of what you get.

a) Multiple brush head options.

One nice thing in general about Braun Oral-B is that they've developed a wide assortment of brush head designs that can be used with all of their rechargeable electric toothbrushes (all of the models on this page are rechargeables). [We discuss Oral-B's brush head line up here.]

That means choosing the PRO 3000 doesn't limit your options as compared to any of the more expensive brushes. If you see another model that comes with a brush head that especially appeals to you, the 3000 can use it too. (This includes the option of using the Deep Sweep head if you're incline to using a more traditional type of toothbrush.)

b) Comparing brushing modes.

The PRO 3000 and higher-end models feature multiple brushing modes.

  • We're of the opinion that the average user (meaning the vast, vast majority) are best served just using their brush at its full-power setting.
  • We basically consider the other modes offered to be novelties. (We explain our position here, as well as discuss Oral-B brushing modes in general.)
Which is the full-power setting?
  • With most Oral-B rechargeables, full-power mode is termed "Daily Clean."
  • As an equivalent, "Deep Clean" mode is the same setting. It's just that with this one the toothbrushes timer switches from 2 minutes to 3 minutes (same brushing action, longer brushing duration).

In our opinion, if you switch to any other setting for full-time use, you're brushing at a reduced power level (you can literally hear your brush working at a different pace in these alternative modes). And as a result, you're reducing your brushing efficiency and likely effectiveness too. We don't see the advantage of that.

The PRO 3000 compared to other models.

Here are the brushing modes the better Oral-B models offer.

  • PRO 3000 - Daily Clean, Sensitive, Gum Care
  • Pro 5000 with Bluetooth Connectivity - Deep Clean, Whitening, Sensitive, Gum Care, Tongue Clean
  • White or Black 7000 with Bluetooth Connectivity - Deep Clean, Whitening, Sensitive, Gum Care, Tongue Clean

As you can see, the PRO 3000 only features Daily Clean (full-power brushing action, the brush timer runs for 2 minutes) vs. Deep Clean (full-power brushing action, the timer runs for 3 minutes) as with the 5000 and 7000's.

But just in case you're overlooking this fact, there's no rule that says you can't just continue on using your 3000 for a full 3 minutes too, thus creating a perfectly equivalent brushing event.

c) Other differences between our "Best" choice and other models.

Here are some additional differences between the PRO 3000 and higher-priced Oral-B's (Pro 5000 and White/Black 7000). You may feel that they are important to you.

  • The 3000 does not come with a travel case.
  • The 5000 and 7000's battery indicator gives you some idea of how charged up it is (via 3 little lights), whereas the 3000's is more along the line of is or isn't charged (2 little lights).

    For the average user whose brush is either being used or is on it's charging stand, we're not sure this difference matters.

  • The Oral-B website no longer provides a comparison of battery life between its models. But we have found retailer information that suggests that the 7000 and 5000 will last for 10 "days" between chargings. The 3000 for just 7.

    If you travel and don't want to take your charger along, this might be a consideration.

  • Mode selection - The PRO 3000 has an on/off switch that doubles as its mode selector.

    The higher-end Oral-B's have a separate button as the selector. We don't see how that's a great advantage.

  • Excessive pressure indicator - Each of these brushes use the same type of light indicator on the backside of the brush that signals when you are brushing with too much force. For the Bluetooth/SmartGuide models, these respective devices will also signal when you are using too much brushing force.

If you want to evaluate these models further.

We know of two retailers (Bed, Bath & Beyond and Target) that usually have demonstrator models of Oral-B and other electric toothbrushes out on display. The items don't actually work, but you can pick them up and hold them to get an idea of what each is like. In our local area, Target had the wider selection of Oral-B models on display.


Need more information?

Just in case you overlooked it, we have a overview of all current Oral-B models and their features on this page.

Have questions?

If you find you have questions about something you see on this page, or Oral-B powered toothbrushes in general, feel free to post a comment down below and we'll see if we can come up with an answer.

Options after you've purchased.

While sorting through Braun Oral-B toothbrush literature, we frequently ran across mention of their Satisfaction Guarantee. What we saw read:

  • "If you are not 100% satisfied within 60 days of purchase, return it for a full refund."

We saw stipulations about needing proof of purchase (we assume a receipt) and that you, the purchaser, had to pay shipping on the return. We saw one version of this guarantee that only mentioned a 30-day period.

Obviously we don't speak for Oral-B, so if having this option as a backup is important to you, you should check with them for specific details before you buy.

Double check brush features before you buy.

Just so there's no question about what you're getting, double check what we've said on our pages versus what features are listed on the packaging of the brush you plan to buy. That way there won't be any question that you're getting everything you expect.

 

 
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Comments

It seems you're not so keen on the Deep Sweep models. Some other sites seem to like them but maybe just because they're the new thing.

Your confusing the issue of brush head style and models. (You can blame that fact on Oral-B and the way they market their brushes.)

To a great extent, the different brush heads, like the Deep Sweep, can be used on most Oral-B models.

That means you could take one of our "best" choices, buy Deep Sweep replacement heads next time you need heads, and instantly transform it into a Deep Sweep "model."

Doing this with either of our "best" choices would create a brush far superior to the Deep Sweep 1000, and a fair amount cheaper than either of the 5000 models.

Thanks very much for the info- much appreciated.

This company needs a lot of work with simplifying their products and fixing their sloppy, unclear, non user friendly website. Here's what I learned in April 2015. There are 2 Pro 1000's. One, the older model made previous to about 10-11-2014 has a pressure sensor only. The newer model called CrossAction has a pressure sensor which includes the pressure sensor and light sensor. My question to you - Their website says 40,000 for the pro 1000. If I read your website correctly, you note 20,000 pulsations. Where did you get that from and how do you know it is currently accurate for their most recent pro 100 crossaction model?

We have contacted Oral-B and received a reply (see paragraphs above). Based on their response, we can say that the information found on this page is accurate.

Very clear & concise.
Excellent job & a great shame that Oral-B have not decided to simplify their product line up & the attendant info.
I note today (May1st) that Ebay list many Oral-B products that introduce further confusion. For example two heads & one charger .........?

What is the weight difference between the professional care 1000 and 3000? I need to buy one of them for my 8 yr old. I know the 5000 is too heavy. Please provide any info on weights of the professional series. Thanks for all you help.

We contacted Oral-B. They stated that the ProfessionalCare 5000 weighed 165 grams. The 3000 and 1000 models both weigh the same, 125 grams (almost 25% less). The Vitality (a "lesser" model) comes in at 110 grams.

I purchased the two pack of the 2000 at Costco as someone else mentioned here. I find the speed slow. I called Oral B and they told me that the speed, 20,000, was the same on all models and that the different brush heads altered the rhythm only.
That seems different than what I read above. What is the truth? I am not interested in an app or Bluetooth. I previously have used Phillips sonic care but my dentist recommends a round brush head. What options are available that might seem stronger or faster since I find the 2000 slow and frustrating. That is true of both settings on that model.

We've finally reached a point where we feel that if there was a company we wouldn't do business with just out of principle, it would be Oral B.

It's our opinion that no company could be doing a worse job in the way they name and market their toothbrushes. Having contacted their help staff repeatedly about issues, it's our impression that even their representatives have trouble keeping the facts about their products straight.

Per the premise of this page and its selection criteria, as a new rule we're only going to address issues associated with models mentioned at the top of this page. (The 2000 is not one of these models. We do see this brush sold outside of the USA, and then the one-off Costco version you mention. But it's not a model listed on the Oral B website as being one of their current models.)

Having said that, based on what we know about the models discussed on this page, it's our impression that you can distinguish a 40,000 pulses-per-minute Oral B brush and a 20,000 by way of the fact that the higher speed brushes offer (at minimum) two brushing modes [typically Daily Clean (full 40,000 speed) and Sensitive (20,000 speed)]. (Hence the single-mode 1000 models mentioned above are, as we report, 20,000 brushes.)

That would suggest that the 2000 model is a 40,000 brush (you should notice that each mode on your brush runs at a different speed). That concurs with the (now deleted) comment you read on our pages reporting what the Oral B representative we contacted told us about the 2000 in June 2015.

Hi there,
Thank you for a very thorough article, and I read it all before I went ahead and got the one brush with most features, but was also discounted the most at Shaver Shop Australia, so it ended up being the same price as the line below.

Anyway, when I got into the store, the attendant asked me if I travel alot. And since I do, I said yes. Apparently the voltages supported by their chargers for the top line, and the other Oral-b as well, only support one level of voltages. So for Australia, I got a charger that only supports 220-240 V. I was very suprised when she told me, and I distrusted it so much that I had to google for it. But it was true, and when I open the package this is what it says on the charger.

Basically, if I try and charge my toothbrush in the US without a heavy Voltage adapter (not just the different pins), it will screw up my charger and probably the toothbrush as well.

According to my research, this also goes the other way around, so if you got a US bought brush and charger, it will not end well trying to charge in Europe. This is REALLY worth mentioning in your article.

Then of course you need to think if that nice travel pouch is really worth anything.

Thanks!

We do touch upon this issue in our text above. But you're absolutely right, this is important to be aware of so we added more info above based on what you've stated.

Also, for anyone open to options and for whom this is an important issue, the charger that comes standard with Sonicare models can be used with both 120 and 240 volt systems.

Hi ~ Some time ago I bought my first OBET: ORAL-B PROFESSIONAL CARE 8900
And I've found it to be very powerful & effective.

Except: The shaft where the brush goes on was a sloppy fit from new, and got worse overtime as it started to ware away, especially in its key-way.

So I bought another, but cheaper model, because the spec on the OBW said that the basics were the same.

However: That's not been the case, as the cheaper models doesn't have the same amount of punch/power.

So I went back to using my first model.

BUT NOW: The battery in my original model needs replacing, & it shaft is really, really sloppy fit.

So I'm thinking of buying a new one, but which one ??

They don't seem to list my original 'ORAL-B PROFESSIONAL CARE 8900' anymore !
So which model would be an equal replacement ???

Help.

We found information about the 8900 on Oral B's website. It stated it was a 40,000 pulsations/8,800 oscillations per minute brush. Having that capability is the basic premise of this page, so from that standpoint we would think our selections above would be equivalents in that regard.

Battery performance might affect the brushing action of a brush. Oral B doesn't provide a lot information about their products but generally just categorizes them as lasting either "up to 7 days" or "up to 10 days" between charges. The later suggests having a relatively stronger battery.

Of course, there is the Oral B "satisfaction" guarantee. You'll have to check the conditions for yourself, but that provides a way of experimenting with different brushes.

We will also state that we have seen some eBay stores that specialize in parts for rebuilding electric toothbrushes. In some cases they will do the repair work for you.

Thanks for the reply, However:
Unfortunately you can't just go by that statement in their specs, ie:

'It stated it was a 40,000 pulsations/8,800 oscillations per minute brush.
...so from that standpoint we would think our selections above would be equivalents in that regard.'

The second model I bought & mentioned previously, was the 'Oral-B ProfessionalCare 1000'
And I chose that as a replacement for my 8900, based on that information, ie they both state that they have '40,000 pulsations/8,800 oscillations per minute'

But there was absolutely NO COMPARISON in performance, between them:
In fact I would say that the 1000 was much worse (in performance) than the many cheaper $10 battery brands, I'd tried previously.

Now that you have mentioned that the newer brush you bought was the ProfessionalCare 1000, we understand your confusion (another poster above had similar confusion).

What you state about the ProfessionalCare 1000 isn't what we report about that brush on this or any other page of our website. And in fact, what you report just confirms that what we state is correct.

We don't consider the ProfessionCare 1000 worth buying and it's not one of the two brushes mentioned above that we state we would opt for.

Please read through this page again, or at least the paragraphs linked to in this reply.

I read (most) of the article and couldn't figure out what "SmartSeries" actually does, is it just having an extra button for the modes or the indicator that you need a new head, or something else? I don't care for the head replacement warning, though having an extra button is nice. On my 3000 it's annoying that to turn it off I have to press the button three times and cycle through the modes.

In regard to what one name means as compared to another, we haven't a clue. Evidently Oral b likes it that way.

Per the premise of this page, and our opinion in general, we think the vast majority of people should just buy the cheapest Oral b that features their top brushing action (3D movement. | 40,000 pulses per min. | 8,800 sweeps/oscillations per min.)

Then, whenever replacement brush heads are needed, switch to whatever style appeals to you the most.

If some higher-end Oral b sports a certain feature you value, then by that one instead.

Sticking with those rules helps to simplify the process.

We'd start by considering another 3000 (assuming yours has died) and working up from there.

I have 3-4 days going back and forth to what should i buy.After reading,i decided to go with the 3000 model but it's quite a huge difference in price.Most of the websites will have listed at 80$ the 3000 and other ones at 100$ the 5000 model.You can see it's not a huge difference in the price.
But on ebay it is a huge difference.My question is how do i have the warranty if the toothbrush stops working from ebay?I contacted Oral B costumer service and they say that they won't accept hand written reciepts,the ebay website states that the seller must provide a hand written receipt.I am so confused.
What is your advice?Should i just spend more money and buy it from a retail store and not ebay?

P.s i also found out that the bluetooth feature for 5000 and 7000 it's not working on tablets like Ipad 2 because requires a bluetooth 2.4 and the ipad 2 has 2.1.This if for those that don't have a smartphone.

We called the regular Oral B phone number for information about their "satisfaction guarantee." (1-800-566-7252)

We asked about "original cash register" receipts vs. documenting a purchase made online. We interpreted their reply to be that you could use documentations such as your "order confirmation" email from an online purchase (it needs to show date of purchase and your cost).

We're not big eBay purchasers, but surely if an electronic payment of some sort is made, you must receive this type of documentation of the transaction.

You should call Oral B again and question them some more about your specifics.

I want to thank you for such a thorough, in-depth evaluation. Several years ago I purchased the Oral B Vitality Floss Action Powered toothbrush. Wasn't too thrilled with it and was looking for a review that I could trust. I had already narrowed it to either the Oral B 1000 or the 3000. Now I feel confident in purchasing the Oral B 3000.

Your right, choosing a 3000 model over a 1000 model is the right choice. You should notice a substantially better brushing experience with it as compared to your old Vitality.

This is a comment from another consumer who is frustrated and angry about the absolutely terrible way Braun provides information about the Oral-B toothbrushes.

I have spent way too much time trying to find out whether the current (as of 10 Oct 2015) Pro 1000 model can be charged by a Type 4736 travel charger (100-240V 50-60Hz 2W) that I bought for a previous Braun toothbrush. (I’ll be traveling outside the U.S. soon and the battery in my old toothbrush is not holding a charge, so I’m looking for a new one.) The charger for the U.S. version of the Pro 1000 cannot be used overseas where the current is different.

I’ve had numerous emails back and forth with Oral-B customer service in an effort to get them to understand the simple question I was asking and then to get a straight answer. I’m not the only person with this question who has gotten the runaround and received information that was simply wrong.
I sympathize with your Dental Staff’s frustration and loved (and agreed with) their comment >>We've finally reached a point where we feel that if there was a company we wouldn't do business with just out of principle, it would be Oral B.<< What is it with this company?
By the way, I had been considering the Pro 1000 because the Oral-B website as of today says flat out >>Cleaning action: Provides 40,000 pulsations and 8,800 oscillations per minute.<< However, having read the comments and responses above, I have absolutely no confidence that this is in fact the case.

Is it time to switch to a Sonicare toothbrush and to hell with Oral-B and Braun? They should be ashamed of themselves. I’m now going to click over to your Sonicare reviews.

Before closing, I want to compliment the people at animated-teeth.com who put together these reviews. Hugely impressive, both in terms of the effort you put forth to gather and assess the info and the quality of the final product. I wish there were more like you in the world.

We feel your frustration.

While there is some cost and effort required on your part, you might consider investigating the details of the Oral-b Money-back Satisfaction Guarantee (so you can strictly adhere to them) and then buy the model you're hoping will work and test it for yourself. If it doesn't, take advantage of their return policy.

Having said that, you can't go wrong with a Sonicare. Those are good brushes, just different.

As far as the Oral-b 1000 goes, that issue caused us a lot of turmoil. However, we really feel our pages have the information right.

Just a side note, our Oral-b pages will be updated in time for holiday shopping. We've just completed updating our Sonicare ones earlier this month.

Hi I am sorry and this may be repetitive. I want to buy the Oral B 3000 from Amazon. My question is whether we know for sure whether this will work (for the power charger / not the plug pins which are easy to modify using an adapter) in a 210-240 V environment?

Thanks!

No, that's not what we report above on this page.

Here's a link to a more detailed explanation of this matter.

I am researching purchasing an electric toothbrush for myself and my husband along with a 12yo and 9yo.

From what I understand I would want to get the Pro 1000 since it has only 20,000 ppm and would be the preferred brush for those with sensitive teeth. Is that correct? I have heard of people switching back to a manual brush after trying an electric brush and finding it to rough on their gums. If 20,000 is for those with sensitive teeth, wouldn't I be better off getting the Pro 1000 rather than the Pro 3000?

Thanks!

You should consult with your dentist or hygienist before making a choice. Here's why:

It would be expected that the "typical" adult user can easily tolerate a 40,000/3D brushing action. However, in your case you anticipate that you cannot. The question then becomes why?

Is it because your gum health is poor? If so, the less effective brushing action of a 20,000/3D model might clean more effectively than you have been when using a regular toothbrush. But generally speaking you could expect a greater level of gum health improvement when using a model with a more effective brushing action.

The idea is that as the health of your gums improves they become less sensitive (at least for many people, that's one reason why Sonicare models offer their Easy-Start feature). And if all of this first scenario is true for your situation, you might purchase a 3000 model and initially use it on the Sensitive setting. Then later on when your gums are in better health, switch to its full-power mode. Maintaining a higher level of gum health should be easier over the long term when using the better brush set to its most effective mode.

If it is the touch of the brush to your teeth themselves that causes your sensitivity, then this is an issue that your dentist should be addressing (in cases where a person's teeth are otherwise in good health, simply using a toothpaste for "sensitive teeth," or else fluoride applications, might be all the treatment that's needed).

However, if you've already sought treatment for this matter from your dentist to no avail, then possibly a lower speed brushing action must be used. But don't choose a second-tier brush without knowing that a solution doesn't exist.

So, some questions need to be answered. It seems possibly only your dentist or hygienist can answer them and give you the proper advice. To us, the 3000 seems the better choice (more options, although admittedly more expensive). But like you've stated, it's not if there's no chance you can make use of its more powerful brushing setting.

I've seen two different products from Oral B in the 3000 series. One is referred to as the Oral B Pro (TM) 3000 and the other is referred to as the Oral B Professional Care (TM) 3000. They each have, from what I have seen, different packaging. By the way, each of the Pro and Professional Care branding have the little Trade Mark (TM) symbol above it. Have you come across this issue? I've also noticed that the color of the handle for the 3000 Pro is a lighter blue than that of the 3000 Professional Care. Perhaps the 3000 Professional Care is either an older or a newer model. If you could shed some light on this, it would be appreciated.

We're under the impression that the Pro 3000 and ProfessionalCare 3000 brushs are essentially (if not exactly) the same brush.

The Oral B ProfessionalCare 3000 was on our Best list last year and was replaced this year by the PRO 3000. It and the ProfessionalCare 4000 were the two brushes that last year we thought made best choices.

In terms of those features we think are most important (brushing modes, brushing action) and even those we don't care so much about (type of brush head it comes with, pressure indicator, brushing timer, lack of travel case) we are unaware of any differences between these two models except for their name.

Generally speaking, it is the number on an Oral-B model (like the 3000 here) that defines the characteristics of the brush, and hence explains the similarities of these two brushes.

I went from a standard battery powered Oral B to a rechargeable model last year, but discovered the rechargeable battery only lasted about 15 months. It then died and would no longer take a charge. When I investigated replacing the rechargeable battery, I learned that the device is not designed for it to be replaceable. In other words you have to take the whole thing apart, modify a store-bought rechargeable battery to fit and then solder it back in before reassembling. Poor design unless you want to design obsolescance. A complaint to the company didn't go anywhere, not even an acknowledgment that the design should be changed to make the battery replaceable!

We agree with your complaint and consider a design of planned obsolescence an insult to both consumer pocketbooks and the environment. However, we can't say that this approach is unique to just Oral-B. Sonicare products get a "fail" in this regard too.

You seem well versed on what your options are. But for others, we discuss Oral-B battery replacement here.

Planned-obsolescence design is just another reason to follow this page's suggestion. Buy the cheapest model that meets your needs and nothing more.

I have look appreciatively at your sites guidelines and have learned a lot. I decided I wanted a Model 4000. I went shopping and that's when I found more than one model of the 4000. Can you tell me the difference between an ORAL B Healthy Clean Pro White Precision 4000 and an Oral-B Professional Care SMARTSERIES 4000? I'm ready to buy, but I want to get the best Model 4000 that is available. Thanks so much for your assistance and your site in general.

We won't answer that question for you, only for fear of not answering it precisely. Creating the illusion that different items they sell are actually different brushes is a smoke-and-mirrors thing that seems to be an important part of Oral-B marketing. We don't think they actually are, but you'll need to come to that conclusion for yourself.

We'll also mention that there is no 4000 model in the current line up of Oral-B products as listed on their website.
We mention a 4000 above because we had details about it from the year before when doing this review. We liked that brush.

As mentioned here, generally speaking its the number part of a brush's name that indicates its type and level of features. So it would be our expectation that both brushes you are looking at are very very similar.

We looked up the precise model names you mentioned. What we saw at one major online retailer was that one was still sold but not the other. The pictures shown of both models (the actual brush, stand and case) looked identical, except for possibly the brush head (which we didn't have a close up of). But we have no way of knowing if what we saw is the same as what you've seen.

We'd expect the biggest difference between the two is simply the brush head they come with. And since you'll be replacing that in a few months, we assign no value to that factor at all because you can replace it with any other type that you want then.
We'd be surprised if you don't find that the number and types of brushing modes offered isn't the same (a premise of our comment above about all models with the same number share similar features).
If there's much of a price difference between the models you're looking at, there may be differences in how many brush heads are included or a travel case.

It would be our opinion that Oral-B doesn't want to sell brushes based on merit (which they could), but just a gimmicky name. It seems to be their goal to create confusion about their products, which is sad.

First I want to thank you for this thorough info - very helpful. I have some info to add. My OralB battery is wearing out so I just bought the Costco package "Oral B Professional Care 2000" which as 2 complete toothbrushes, 2 charges, 1 extra brush head. I used a $30 off coupon, so my price was $70. After reading your page, I wanted to know if the 2000 had the recommended 40k pulses/minute. I just got off phone with Oral B, who verified that the Costco package Prof. 2000 has 40k pulses/minute. I think it's a good deal, especially if you buy using the coupon. Costco offers this periodically, so watch for it if you're a Costco member.

Thank you for the information.

Thanks for a brilliant site. I decided for the 56€ Oral-B PRO CrossAction 2000 thanks to the information provided here. After using it for a couple of weeks I wanted to write and clarify one thing. It is mentioned on this site that one way of knowing if any model has the recommended 40k pulses/minute is that it would offer 2 speedes. If the 2000 model in fact has 40k pulses/minute it is the exception to this rule, it only has 1 speed "Daily Clean" and a second pulsing on/off speed (Gum Care) which I don't believe counts as a speed by it self. I have not been able to find any written documentation whether it pulses with 20k or 40k and since I only have this model I cannot compare with anything else.

FINALLY! A website that TRIES to provide a modicum of scientific or procedural basis for its own opinions & views that it states!
I love that you at least try to tell people why and try to show a REPEATABLE way of obtaining results that can back up your views.
Again, my sincerest thanks! I hope that you continue to improve and show the rest of the world which brushes (sonic or non-sonic) are the best in which situations, and why.

Thanks Stu

Excellent article. I think you have prevented many a mistake being made.

Thanks

Help! You never mention the Pulsonic, which I really like. Where can I find replacement brush heads at a reasonable price?

The criteria for inclusion on this page is that a brush is listed in the current line up on Oral-b's (USA) website. We don't see that brush listed there.

We're assuming that that means it's no longer sold in the US. (We don't even find brush heads for it for sale on the Oral-b website. However we do see them for sale online at eBay, Walmart and Amazon.)

Since that is a sonicare-style brush, we do mention it in passing on our Best Sonicares page (you'll need to open the drop-down box).

I was all set to buy an Oral-B 5000 tooth brush until a review pointed out that they have Ni-Cad batteries not Lithium.
I pretty much do not buy Ni-Cads anymore, you have to keep them on a charger 24 hours a day even when you don't use them. So that ended the sale promptly.
Please add battery type to your analysis.

Actually most all Oral-B brushes use NiMH (nickel metal hydride) batteries (we confirmed this with an Oral-b representative). The new 8000 and 9000 Genius models (which we haven't added to this review yet) have lithium-ion batteries.

Per your request, we've added battery information to our Oral-b pages.

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