Quizzes about Types of Teeth and Tooth Identification and Numbering - for students of all ages.

The online quizzes accessed on this page cover the topics of tooth identification and numbering.

The first three exams can be used to help students gain proficiency in using the Universal Tooth Numbering system.

Our next four tests drill on the subject of tooth identification, both by shape and the position in the dental arch. Our remaining quiz targets the topic of deciduous (baby) teeth identification.

Take the quiz :                                 Pre-test study materials :       

1) Teeth-numbering quizzes. (Using the Universal / National System.)

What is the Universal Tooth Numbering System?

The Universal system is the most popular tooth identification method used in the USA. This system has been adopted by the American Dental Association and is the numbering scheme most utilized by dental insurance companies and dentists alike. It is also sometimes referred to as the National Tooth Number system.

How does this system work when identifying permanent teeth?

Chart showing the Universal Tooth Numbering System.

For permanent teeth ("adult teeth"), the Universal system assigns a number, ranging from 1 to 32, to each individual tooth.

Here are the rules:

  • Tooth #1 is the maxillary (upper) right third molar.
  • From tooth #1, sequential numbering moves forward along the maxillary arch all the way across and around to the maxillary (upper) left third molar, which is tooth #16.
  • Tooth numbering then continues on by dropping down to the mandibular (lower) left third molar (tooth #17).
  • It then proceeds all of the way around the mandibular arch until tooth #32, the mandibular (lower) third molar, has been reached.

How it works if some teeth are missing.

There is the possibility that a person will have some missing teeth. (Teeth that have been extracted, have not yet come in or else did not form.) In the case of missing teeth, the numbering is carried out as if these teeth did exist. For example:

  • If a person has all of their teeth except for their wisdom teeth, their teeth will be numbered 2 thru 15 and 18 thru 31.
  • If a person has had their lower right first molar extracted (tooth #30), the teeth on either side of this tooth space will still keep the numbers 29 and 31.
  • Some people have all four of their second premolars (bicuspids) removed as part of their orthodontic treatment plan. Even though once they get their braces off no spaces will exist, when numbering their teeth, the person will still not have teeth assigned the numbers 4, 13, 20 and 29.

Ready to take the quiz?  Use this link!  »  Tooth Numbering quiz #1  »  #2  »  #3

Exam terms and definitions.

Permanent teeth and their assigned numbers.
(Universal Tooth Numbering System)

Chart showing the Universal Tooth Numbering System.
 

Tooth #1:     Maxillary (upper) right 3rd molar
Tooth #2:     Maxillary (upper) right 2nd molar
Tooth #3:     Maxillary (upper) right 1st molar
Tooth #4:     Maxillary (upper) right 2nd premolar (bicuspid)
Tooth #5:     Maxillary (upper) right 1st premolar (bicuspid)
Tooth #6:     Maxillary (upper) right canine (cuspid)
Tooth #7:     Maxillary (upper) right lateral incisor
Tooth #8:     Maxillary (upper) right central incisor
Tooth #9:     Maxillary (upper) left central incisor
Tooth #10:   Maxillary (upper) left lateral incisor
Tooth #11:   Maxillary (upper) left canine (cuspid)
Tooth #12:   Maxillary (upper) left 1st premolar (bicuspid)
Tooth #13:   Maxillary (upper) left 2nd premolar (bicuspid)
Tooth #14:   Maxillary (upper) left 1st molar
Tooth #15:   Maxillary (upper) left 2nd molar
Tooth #16:   Maxillary (upper) left 3rd molar
Tooth #17:   Mandibular (lower) left 3rd molar
Tooth #18:   Mandibular (lower) left 2nd molar
Tooth #19:   Mandibular (lower) left 1st molar
Tooth #20:   Mandibular (lower) left 2nd premolar (bicuspid)
Tooth #21:   Mandibular (lower) left 1st premolar (bicuspid)
Tooth #22:   Mandibular (lower) left canine (cuspid)
Tooth #23:   Mandibular (lower) left lateral incisor
Tooth #24:   Mandibular (lower) left central incisor
Tooth #25:   Mandibular (lower) right central incisor
Tooth #26:   Mandibular (lower) right lateral incisor
Tooth #27:   Mandibular (lower) right canine (cuspid)
Tooth #28:   Mandibular (lower) right 1st premolar (bicuspid)
Tooth #29:   Mandibular (lower) right 2nd premolar (bicuspid)
Tooth #30:   Mandibular (lower) right 1st molar
Tooth #31:   Mandibular (lower) right 2nd molar
Tooth #32:   Mandibular (lower) right 3rd molar


2) The 'Kinds of Teeth' quiz.

        Ready to take the quiz?  Use this link!  »  The Kinds of Teeth quiz.

Exam terms and definitions.

Incisors -
Incisors have a broad, chisel-like biting edge and a single root. Upper incisors are larger than lower incisors.
  A maxillary (upper) central incisor. A mandibular (lower) central incisor.
Canines -
Canine teeth are also called cuspid or eyeteeth. They have one large pointed cusp and a very long single root.
  A mandibular (lower) canine (cuspid).
Bicuspids -
These teeth (especially the upper ones) usually have two obvious cusps. Lower bicuspids just have one root. Upper ones can have one or two. Bicuspid teeth are also called premolars.
  A maxillary (upper) premolar (bicuspid).
Molars -
The molars are the largest teeth in the mouth. They have four or five cusps on their chewing surface. Upper molars have three roots, lower ones just two.
  A maxillary (upper) molar. A mandibular (lower) molar.

The 'Tooth Type' and 'Tooth Name' quizzes.

        Ready to take the quiz?  Use this link!  »  The Name That Tooth quiz.  »  The Tooth Types quiz.

Exam terms and definitions.

Tooth chart for 'Name That Tooth' quiz.
» Incisors
these teeth are the first permanent teeth to erupt that replace a deciduous tooth. They have straight biting edges, a flat front surface and a single root. The shape of these teeth is useful for cutting through food.

A) Central Incisors -
these teeth butt up against the midline of the mouth, making them the center-most teeth. Upper central incisors are larger than upper lateral incisors. Lower central incisors are the smallest teeth in the mouth.

B) Lateral Incisors -
the second teeth from the midline. Upper lateral incisors look like upper central incisors but are smaller in size. Lower lateral incisors are slightly larger than lower central incisors.

C) Canines -
the third tooth from the midline. These teeth are also known as eyeteeth and cuspids. Their biting edge is composed of a single large cusp that is suited for both seizing and holding food as well as cutting and tearing it. Canines have a single root. These teeth are the longest teeth in their respective jaws, the upper canine being the longest tooth in the mouth.

» Premolars
these teeth are also known as bicuspids. They have a shape that is useful for both cutting and tearing as well as crushing food.

D) First Premolars -
the fourth tooth from the midline in each quadrant. Upper first premolars have two distinct cusps and have either one or two roots. Lower first premolars are the smallest type of premolar. They have one root, a prominent cheek-side cusp and a less pronounced tongue-side cusp.

E) Second Premolars -
the fifth tooth from the midline. Second premolars have one root. Upper second premolars have two distinct cusps. Lower second premolars have a single cheek-side cusp and either one or two less pronounced tongue-side cusps.

» Molars
these teeth have broad surfaces that are used to crush and grind food. They have four or five distinct cusps, however, the cusps are shorter and more blunted that those found on other cusped teeth.

F) First Molars -
the sixth tooth from the midline in each quadrant. Another term for these teeth is "six-year molars" since they usually come in at age six years. These teeth are the first permanent ones to come in that do not replace a deciduous tooth. Upper first molars have four (or possibly five) prominent cusps and three roots. Lower first molars have five cusps and only two roots.

G) Second Molars -
the seventh tooth from midline. Another term for these teeth is "twelve-year molars" since they usually come in at age twelve years. Upper second molars have four cusps and three roots. Lower second molars have four cusps and two roots. Second molars are usually slightly smaller in size than first molars.

H) Third Molars -
the eighth tooth from the midline. Another term for these teeth is the "wisdom teeth." Upper third molars have four cusps and three roots. Lower third molars have four cusps and two roots. The roots of third molars are often fused together, at least somewhat. Third molars are usually smaller in size than second molars.

The 'Which Type of Tooth is This?' quiz.

        Ready to take the quiz?  Use this link!  »  The Which Type of Tooth is This quiz.

Exam terms and definitions.

Tooth chart for 'Type of Tooth' quiz.
Incisors -
Incisors are the teeth found in the center of the mouth. They have a broad chisel-like edge and a single root. We use them to bite our food into pieces. (Blue arrows)

Canines -
Canine teeth are also called cuspid or eyeteeth. The have one pointed cusp and a long single root. They are used to tear food. Cats and dogs have very big canine teeth. (Orange arrows)

Bicuspids -
Bicuspids are located between the molar and canine teeth. They usually have two pointed cusps and can have one or two roots. We use them to tear and crush food. (Green arrows)

Molars -
Molars are the teeth that are positioned furthest back in the mouth. Their function is to crush and grind food. Lower molars have two roots, upper ones have three. (Purple arrows)

Anterior teeth [front teeth] -
Anterior teeth are those teeth that are located closest to the front of the mouth. The anterior teeth are the incisors and the canines. (Blue and orange arrows)

Posterior teeth [back teeth] -
Posterior teeth are those teeth that are located in the rear of the mouth. The posterior teeth are the bicuspids and the molars. (Green and purple arrows)

The 'Which type of baby tooth is this?' quiz.

        Ready to take the quiz?  Use this link!  »  The Which Type of Baby Tooth is This?' quiz.  »  Deciduous Teeth quiz.

Exam terms and definitions.

Tooth chart for 'Baby Teeth' quiz.
Incisors -
Incisor teeth are found in the very front of the mouth. We use our incisor teeth to bite food into pieces. There are eight deciduous incisor teeth. (Gold arrows)

Canines -
Canine teeth are also called eyeteeth or cuspids. These pointed teeth are used to tear food. Dogs and cats have very big canine teeth. There are four deciduous canine teeth. (Green arrows)

Molars -
The molars are found in the rear of the mouth. We use them to crush and grind food. There are eight deciduous molars. (Blue arrows)

Anterior teeth [front teeth] -
Anterior teeth are those teeth that are located in the front portion of the mouth. The anterior deciduous teeth are the incisors and the canines. (Gold and green arrows)

Posterior teeth [back teeth] -
Posterior teeth are those teeth that are found in the back of the mouth. The posterior deciduous teeth are the molars. (Blue arrows)

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